Combustion In Pre-Industrial English Literature

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225 pages
Lingua:
 English
The book takes authors over the time span from Chaucer to Jane Austen and analyses their work for features of combustion.
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Sull'Autore

Clifford Jones has spent a working lifetime in teaching, research and writing on fuels and combustion. He has held academic posts in the UK and Australia and has held visiting posts in a number of countries including Kazakhstan. He has written over 20 books and numerous papers and articles. He has maj...

Description
Content

The book takes authors over the time span from Chaucer to Jane Austen and analyses their work for features of combustion. Coal and export and import thereof feature throughout the book, the time span of which predates the oil industry. There is a good deal on accidental fires. Shakespeare receives considerable coverage as one of a total on one hundred and one authors who feature. Others include John Donne and (from much later) Francis Scott Key.

The Great Fire of London features several times as does the American War of Independence. The organisation of the book is author by author in chronological order. There is usually a portrait of the author and introduction in tabular form of quotes from his or her work relevant to combustion. There is discussion point by point, and in many ways the emphasis of the book is application of knowledge of combustion retrospectively to writings from a time when such knowledge was not available. There were two points of interest, recurrent in the book, to arise from this. One is that such knowledge was often intuited long before it was formally expressed according to scientific principles. The second is that in application of combustion or in prevention of unwanted combustion ingenuity which surprises an expert reader is often apparent. This is the first book to investigate English literature in this way, and the author has brought to its writing both a lifetime’s professional involvement with combustion matters and also an interest in English literature which, though not his source of income, he has had since boyhood. The result is a satisfying synthesis of material expected to be of interest to scientists as well as to professional historians of science.

  1. Wace (approx. 1100–1174)
  2. John Gower (1330–1408)
  3. Geoffrey Chaucer (1343–1400)
  4. Thomas Malory (1405–1471)
  5. Stephen Hawes (c. 1474–1521)
  6. Richard Tottel (1530–1594)
  7. Thomas Sackville (1536–1608)
  8. Edmund Spenser (1552–1599)
  9. Sir Philip Sidney (1554–1586)
  10. George Peele (1556–1596)
  11. Thomas Kyd (1558–1594)
  12. Thomas Lodge (1558–1625)
  13. Robert Greene (1558–1592)
  14. Anthony Munday (1560–1633)
  15. Thomas Hariot (1560–1621)
  16. Sir Francis Bacon (1561–1626)
  17. Michael Drayton (1563–1631)
  18. Christopher Marlowe (1564–1593)
  19. William Shakespeare (1564–1616)
  20. Thomas Campion (1567–1620)
  21. Sir John Davies (1569–1626)
  22. Thomas Heywood (1570–1641)
  23. Thomas Dekker (1570–1632)
  24. John Donne (1572–1631)
  25. Ben Jonson (1572–1637)
  26. Thomas Coryat (1577–1617)
  27. John Webster (1578–1632)
  28. Thomas Middleton (1580–1627)
  29. John Smith (1580–1631)
  30. Robert Herrick (1591–1674)
  31. Thomas Carew (1595–1640)
  32. Martin Parker (1600–1656)
  33. Thomas Browne (1605–1682)
  34. John Milton (1608–1674)
  35. Sir John Suckling (1609–1641)
  36. James Harrington (1611–1677)
  37. Anne Bradstreet (1612–1672)
  38. Samuel Butler (1613–1680)
  39. Richard Lovelace (1617–1657)
  40. Abraham Cowley (1618–1667)
  41. Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)
  42. Margaret Cavendish (1623–1673)
  43. John Bunyan (1628–1688)
  44. Aphra Behn (1640–1689)
  45. Daniel Defoe (1660–1731)
  46. Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)
  47. Nicholas Rowe (1674–1718)
  48. Alexander Pope (1688–1744)
  49. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689–1762)
  50. Samuel Richardson (1689–1761)
  51. George Lillo (1691–1739)
  52. Eliza Haywood (1693–1756)
  53. Françoise de Graffigny (1695–1758)
  54. Stephen Duck (1705–1756)
  55. Henry Fielding (1707–1754)
  56. Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)
  57. Laetitia Pilkington (1709–1750)
  58. Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)
  59. Lawrence Sterne (1713–1768)
  60. Yosa Buson (1716–1784)
  61. Sir Horace Walpole (1717–1797)
  62. Tobias Smollet (1721–1771)
  63. Sarah Scott (1720–1795)
  64. Christopher Smart (1722–1771)
  65. Frances Sheridan (1724–1766)
  66. Frances Brooke (1724–1789)
  67. Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774)
  68. William Cowper (1731–1800)
  69. Thomas Paine (1737–1809)
  70. Eliza Parsons (1739–1811)
  71. James Boswell (1740–1795)
  72. Johann David Wyss (1743–1818)
  73. Olaudah Equiano a.k.a. Gustavus Vassa (1745–1797)
  74. Henry MacKenzie (1745–1831)
  75. Hugh Henry Brackenridge (1748–1816)
  76. Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751–1816)
  77. Frances Burney (1752–1840)
  78. Philip Freneau (1752–1832)
  79. Elizabeth Inchbald (1753–1821)
  80. George Crabbe (1754–1832)
  81. Robert Kerr (1755–1813)
  82. William Blake (1757–1827)
  83. Mary Robinson (1757–1800)
  84. Ryokan (1758–1831)
  85. Robert Burns (1759–1796)
  86. Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797)
  87. William Beckford (1760–1844)
  88. Susanna Rowson (1762–1824)
  89. Ann Radcliffe (1764–1823)
  90. Maria Edgeworth (1768–1849)
  91. Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821)
  92. William Wordsworth (1770–1850)
  93. Sir Walter Scott (1771–1832)
  94. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834)
  95. Josiah Quincy (1772–1864)
  96. Robert Southey (1774–1843)
  97. Jane Austen (1775–1817)
  98. Matthew Lewis (1775–1818)
  99. Edward Augustus Kendall (1776–1842)
  100. Francis Scott Key (1779–1843)
  101. Frances Trollope (1779–1863)