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Have no Fear of Zoology

A stroll through the animal kingdom for teachers & students

Have no Fear of Zoology
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ISBN: 978-87-403-2011-4
1 edition
Pages : 202
  • Price: 129.00 kr
  • Price: €13.99
  • Price: £13.99
  • Price: ₹250
  • Price: $13.99
  • Price: 129.00 kr
  • Price: 129.00 kr

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About the book

  1. Description
  2. Content

Description

After an introduction to the evolution of animals and the systematics of the animal kingdom, the most important animal phyla, from the unicellular organisms to the mammals, are presented with regard to their structure, function and their adaptations to the environment. Emphasis is placed on the importance of animals for humans. Each chapter begins with a presentation of the most important technical terms and ends with questions for self-examination of the learned material. Information on current specialist literature is found in a reference list. The book contains 17 tables, 13 illustrations and 27 photos.

About the author

Prof. emer. Dr. Klaus Hubert Hoffmann was Chairman of Animal Ecology I at the University of Bayreuth until 2012. After completing his studies in Biology, Chemistry and Geography at the Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuremberg, he received his doctorate at the Institute of Animal Ecology and Animal Physiology of FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg. Following a postdoctoral year at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego in 1974, he took position of a research associate at the Institute of Zoology at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. In 1978 Prof. Hoffmann accepted a professorship for General Zoology at the University of Ulm. In 1990, he was visiting professor at the University of Kuwait and received the Merckle Research Prize in the same year. In 1994 Prof. Hoffmann accepted the position as Chair of Animal Ecology I at the University of Bayreuth. From 1997 to 1999 he was Dean of the Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Geosciences at the University of Bayreuth. From 2001 to 2007, he was the spokesman for the German Research Foundation’s 678 Graduate School “Ecological importance of chemical signals in insects – from structure to function”. From 2002 to 2010 he was President of the Council of European Entomology Congresses. In 2002 he received the Alexander-von-Humboldt Research Prize South Africa, which involved several research stays at the University of Capetown. From 2008 to 2012, Prof. Hoffmann was the coordinator of the Master’s degree program “Molecular Ecology” at the University of Bayreuth.

His research in entomology, animal physiology and molecular ecology resulted in 160 original publications, 46 reviews, book contributions and three books. Prof. Hoffmann is an Associate Editor of the journal “Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C (Biosciences)”. Since 2015, he has been a Senior Expert of the Senior Expert Service (SES) in Bonn.
https://www.bayceer.uni-bayreuth.de/toek1/de/mitarbeiter/mit/mitarbeiter_detail.php?id_obj=14074
https://de-de.facebook.com/klaus.hoffmann.7509
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Klaus_Hoffmann
http://www.linkedin.com/profile/preview?locale=de_DE&trk=prof-0-sb-preview-primary-button

Content

  1. Objectives 
  2. Evolution, systematic zoology and the animal cell 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Species, the basic unit of living organisms 
    3. Species formation and adaptive radiation 
    4. Systematics of the animal kingdom and the formation of a phylogenetic system 
    5. Mechanisms of evolution and the tree of life (dendrogram) 
    6. Structure and function of the eukaryotic cell 
    7. Review questions 
  3. Protozoa / Protista 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Characteristics and systematics of the Protozoa 
    3. Amoeboid movement 
    4. Movement by cilia and flagella 
    5. Some metabolic features in the Protozoa 
    6. Multiplication and reproduction 
    7. Distribution and ecology of the Protozoa 
    8. Protozoa – parasites and human pathogens 
    9. Review questions 
  4. Phylum Porifera (sponges, Parazoa) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Evolution of Metazoa 
    3. Characteristics of Parazoa 
    4. Physiology of sponges 
    5. Reproduction and development of sponges 
    6. Economic importance of sponges 
    7. Review questions 
  5. Phylum Cnidaria (Eumetazoa) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Eumetazoa 
    3. Systematics and characteristics of Cnidaria 
    4. Reproduction and alternation of generations 
    5. Nutrition of Cnidaria 
    6. Stock- and reef formation 
    7. Toxins in the coelenterates and coral fluorescent proteins 
    8. Review questions 
  6. Phylum Plathelminthes (flatworms) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Acoelomic bilaterians 
    3. Systematics and characteristics of Plathelminthes 
    4. The ability for regeneration in Turbellaria 
    5. Parasitic flatworms in domestic animals and humans 
    6. Anaerobic energy metabolism in parasitic flatworms 
    7. Review questions 
  7. Phylum Nemertea (Nemertini, “ribbon worms“) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Nemertea 
    3. Reproduction and development of Nemertea 
    4. Review questions 
  8. Phylum Rotifera (rotifers, wheel animals) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Rotifera 
    3. Reproduction of Rotifera 
    4. Review questions 
  9. Phylum Nematoda (roundworms) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Nematoda 
    3. Reproduction and development of Nematoda 
    4. Anaerobic living in nematodes 
    5. Parasitic nematodes in domestic animals and humans 
    6. The use of nematodes in pest control 
    7. The model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans 
    8. Review questions 
  10. Annelida (segmented worms) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Annelida 
    3. The lugworm Arenicola, a representative of the polychaetes 
    4. Earthworms as representatives of the oligochaetes 
    5. Respiratory blood pigments in polychaetes and oligochaetes 
    6. The medical leech as representative of the Hirudinea 
    7. Review questions 
  11. Mollusca (mollusks) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of the Mollusca 
    3. The shell of the Mollusca 
    4. Class Gastropoda: the snails 
    5. Class Bivalvia: the mussels 
    6. The cephalopods (Cephalopoda) 
    7. The transition from water to terrestrial life among the mollusks 
    8. Special metabolic pathways in mollusks 
    9. Importance of mollusks for humans 
    10. Review questions 
  12. Phylum Tardigrada (water bears or moss piglets) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Tardigrada 
    3. Cryptobiosis in tardigrades 
    4. Review questions 
  13. Phylum Onychophora (velvet worms) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Onychophora 
    3. The molting hormone ecdysone in Onychophora 
    4. Review questions 
  14. Phylum Arthropoda (arthropods) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Arthropoda 
    3. The exoskeleton of Arthropoda 
    4. The extremities (limbs) of Arthropoda 
    5. The compound eye of Arthropoda 
    6. Subphylum Chelicerata 
    7. Subphylum Crustacea 
    8. Subphylum Antennata (Tracheata) 
    9. Review questions 
  15. Phylum Echinodermata (echinoderms) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Echinodermata 
    3. Asteroidea – the starfish 
    4. Echinoidea – the sea urchins 
    5. Holothuroidea – the sea cucumbers 
    6. Review questions 
  16. Phylum Hemichordata (hemichordates) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of Hemichordata 
    3. Review questions 
  17. Phylum Chordata (chordates) 
    1. Learning objectives and keywords 
    2. Systematics and characteristics of the Chordata 
    3. Urochordata – the subphylum Tunicata 
    4. Subphylum Cephalochordata – the lancelets 
    5. Review questions 
    6. Vertebrata = Craniata or vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals) 
  18. References 
  19. Answers to review questions 

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