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Project Leadership - Step by Step

Part I

Project Leadership - Step by Step
3.5 (16 reviews)
ISBN: 978-87-7681-553-0
2 edition
Pages : 112
Price: Free

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Summary

This is Volume I of two books on how to master Small- and Medium-Sized Projects - SMPs.

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About the book

  1. Description
  2. Preface
  3. Content
  4. About the Author
  5. Embed

Description

This is Volume I of two books on how to master Small- and Medium-Sized Projects - SMPs. These projects seldom receive serious attention in project literature of today. But the popularity of the project approach means that smaller, ‘everyday’ tasks can be performed as projects. The goal and purpose of the smaller projects are often very different from those of the bigger projects and need a different approach. The books systematically review the steps or ‘Stepstones’ any project manager needs to negotiate. The focus is on SMPs, but all projects could benefit from going through the ‘Stepstones’.

Preface

This book is Volume I in a series of two books on how to master Small- and Medium-Sized Projects - SMPs. These projects are those that seldom receive serious attention in the regular project literature of today. For better or worse, it is the large, costly, complicated projects that are written about, researched and discussed in the media.

But the popularity of the project approach means that many smaller, “everyday” tasks can be performed as projects. These smaller projects, whose goal and purpose are often very different from those of the bigger projects, also need a different type of approach than the large and more complex projects. Preliminary studies are typical. They are short-term investigations put in motion to pave the way for a larger project and require much less in terms of personnel for the actual project work.

It is interesting to note that this is not a new way of operating. Before mass production made its debut, all production was carried out as projects. The individual craftsman made a copy of a product that was individually adapted for the customer. Even car production worked this way until Henry Ford discovered that both mass production and routine production could save unit costs at larger volumes.

Content

Background

Introduction

1. Small- and Medium-Sized Projects – SMPs
1.1 Why SMPs are So Important
1.2 What Separates the Large and Resource-Consuming Projects from SMPs?
1.3 How to Read The Books
1.4 Summary of Chapter 1
1.5 The Conference Example

2. What is an SMP
Stepstone # 1: Screening of the SMP Idea
2.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 1
2.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 1
2.2.1 Creating New Project Ideas
2.2.2 Ranking Ideas
2.2.3 Selecting the Best Idea
2.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 1
2.4 Stepstone # 1 Used on the Conference SMP
Stepstone # 2: Turning the Idea into an SMP
2.5 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 2
2.6 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 2
2.7 Conclusions about Stepstone # 2
2.8 Stepstone # 2 Used on the Conference SMP
2.9 Summary of Chapter 2

3. How to Prepare SMPs
Stepstone # 3: Appointing the SMP’s Project Leader
3.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 3
3.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 3
3.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 3
3.4 Stepstone # 3 Used at the Conference SMP

Stepstone # 4: Appointing the SMP’s Core Team Members
4.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 4
4.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 4
4.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 4
4.4 Stepstone # 4 Used for the Conference SMP

Stepstone # 5: Deciding on the Mission and Goal for the SMP
5.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 5
5.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 5
5.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 5
5.4 Stepstone # 5 Used for the Conference SMP

Stepstone # 6: The Role Distribution in SMPs
6.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 6
6.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone #6
6.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 6
6.4 Stepstone # 6 Used for the Conference SMP

Stepstone # 7: The SMP Master Plan
7.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 7
7.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 7
7.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 7
7.4 Stepstone # 7 Used for the Conference SMP

Stepstone # 8: Agreements and Obligations in SMPs
8.1 Theoretical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 8
8.2 Practical Reflections behind the Statements in Stepstone # 8
8.3 Conclusions about Stepstone # 8
8.4 Stepstone # 8 Used on the Conference SMP
8.5 Summary of Chapter 3

Endnotes

List of Key Words and Expressions

About the Author

About the Author

PhD from Brunel University, Henley Management School, UK, and USC, University of Southern California, USA, 1989. MSc from University of Oslo, 1969.

Main current position: Professor emeritus at the Norwegian School of Management, Oslo.

Additional current positions: Adjunct professor at the University of Tromsø and Harstad (Norway), associate faculty at Henley School of Management (UK), affiliated professor at Fudan University (Shanghai, China), associate faculty at Supaero Technical University, Toulouse, associate faculty at STUniversity in Aix-en-Provence, at CERAM in Sophia Antipolis, and at HEC in Paris, France, International Dean of Studies at PPMI – Pan Pacific Management Institute (Beijing, China), Member of Executive Board, TsHiba,Cape Town Universty, South Africa.

Consultancies: In addition to the large Norwegian companies such as Statoil, Norsk Hydro, Statskraft, NKL, he has also been working internationally in the Philippins (World Bank), Malaysia (World Bank), India (NORAD), Sri Lanka (NORAD),Tanzania (NORAD and DANIDA), Mozambique (NORAD), Malawi (AFDB), Jamaica (NORAD), Bhutan (World Bank), and in Check Republic, China, Denmark,, The Dominican Republic, Egypt, Finland, Germany, Iran,, Italy, Japan, Kenya,, Portugal, Russia, Singapore, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, Trinidad&Tobago,Ukraina, Viet Nam.

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