The Heart of Corporate Social Responsibility

Puntuación:
( 0 )
196 pages
Idioma:
 English
What does “social” mean in Corporate Social Responsibility? Discover what is missed out from most CSR textbooks as it challenges conventional thinking on responsibility in politics and business.
Éste es un eBook gratuito para estudiantes
Regístrate para tener acceso gratuito
Todos los libros de texto para estudiantes gratis, de por vida. Menos de un 15% de pulicidad
 
30 días de prueba gratis
Suscripciones corporativas gratis durante los primeros30 días, luego $5.99/mo
Últimos agregados
Sobre el autor

Peter Challis is a former strategic manager in the civil service and a local authority. He is a qualified accountant and has an MA in Strategic Management from the University of Chichester gained alongside his role in promoting local authority shared services. On leaving salaried employment, Peter wor...

Peter Challis is a former strategic manager in the civil service and a local authority. He is a qualified accountant and has an MA in Strategic Management from the University of Chichester gained alongside his role in promoting local authority shared services. On leaving salaried employment, Peter wor...

Description
Content

There is a difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Corporate Responsibility (CR). The former is based on social justice and the latter on making the free market more efficient. This book argues that the compassion of social justice is being presented by right wing politicians as left wing socialism that would destroy the free market and reduce our standard of living. The dropping of “social” in CSR puts business above society. The social in CSR does not mean socialism but the common good. The society envisaged by neo-liberal ideology has no room for the “social” in CSR. People seeking to understand CSR also need to appreciate the ideologies of managerialism that support unethical management and of New Capitalism with its inhumanity. The book suggests that a new form of business based on fairness between capital and labour, social business, could be built through pressure and active support from citizens and consumers. Citizens need to see through the political spin of the neo-liberals before an alternative to managerialism and New Capitalism can be found. The “social” in CSR accepts that business is responsible to society and that society should not be subservient to business.

About the author

Peter Challis is the director of his own company, Time 4 Social Change. After a career in accountancy, he moved into strategic systems management first as a senior civil servant and then into local government. His mastersí degree in strategic management included a research paper on shared services in the public sector and he worked as an adviser to the Cabinet Office on the subject. After taking voluntary redundancy, he worked as a volunteer on one of the governmentís Big Society vanguard projects. He then helped several charities respond to austerity and Big Society and was a director of some of them. By becoming a reader in Northampton University library and then in Bodleian library at Oxford University, Peter taught himself the sociology of business. From his experience as a strategic manager, his knowledge of sociology and its application to management, Peter began writing for Bookboon. In his spare time, Peter writes science fiction novels and helps look after his disabled daughter.

  1. The Social Dimension of CSR
    1. Introduction
    2. Sociology for the Strategic Manager
    3. Business and people
    4. Behavioural economics, nudge theory and ethics
    5. Thinking about sociology
    6. An introduction to critical reflection and critical theory
    7. Conclusions
    8. References
    9. Further reading
    10. Self-test Questions
  2. Ethics in business and government
    1. Introduction
    2. The political dimension and ideology
    3. Neo-liberalism
    4. Psychological persuasion
    5. Psychology and ethics in politics
    6. Psychology and ethics in business
    7. Conclusions
    8. References
    9. Further reading
    10. Self-test Questions
  3. The Social Contract
    1. Introduction
    2. An Introduction to Social Contract Theory
    3. New Capitalism and Neo-liberalism
    4. Management and ideology
    5. Political ideology in the Third Way and Big Society versions of capitalism
    6. CSR as a system that integrates business within society
    7. Conclusions
    8. References
    9. Further reading
    10. Self-test Questions
  4. Beyond Corporate Social Responsibility
    1. Introduction
    2. Business ethics, social responsibility and morality
    3. Social Responsibility in the US and UK
    4. Social objectives and business strategic management
    5. The social enterprise
    6. Weaknesses in the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility
    7. Conclusions
    8. References
    9. Further Reading
    10. Self-test Questions
  5. The social context of CSR
    1. Introduction
    2. Business as part of society
    3. Corporate Social Irresponsibility
    4. Communitarianism and CSR
    5. What should the responsibility of business be to society?
    6. The power of citizens and consumers
    7. Conclusions
    8. References
    9. Further reading
    10. Self-test Questions
  6. The Social Business
    1. Introduction
    2. Community, society, the state and business
    3. Communitarianism as a political dimension for CSR
    4. The concept of social business
    5. Public services as social businesses
    6. Social control of business
    7. Conclusions
    8. References
    9. Further reading
    10. Self-test Questions